Easy Eggplant Parmigiana

Easy Eggplant Parmigiana

Easy Eggplant Parmigiana 

Easy Eggplant Parmigiana

This is my all time favorite dish

Even die hard meat eaters will love this simple recipe!

Ingredients 

Grated 2 cups parmesan cheese or any cheese of you choice

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Dip eggplant slices in egg, then in the crumbs, place in hot oil and fry for about 3 minutes on either side, or until golden brown. Set aside to drain on paper towels.

Sauce 

Easy Eggplant Parmigiana

Pre-heat oven to 450 degree oven

1 tbs olive oil

tsp rock salt

dash of balsamic vinegar

1 red pepper seeded and cut into pieces

1 zucchini sliced and diced bite sized pieces

I garlic Clove top chopped off and drizzled with olive oil

1 jar of your fave pasta sauce

wrap garlic in tinfoil and cook for 30 min

Place peppers and zucchini in baking dish coating with olive oil and salt

Pop in the oven and cook for 20 to 20 min

Place sauce in blender adding the veggies and garlic (squeezing the cloves from the skin)

Blend on high adding a dash of balsamic

Put It All Together 

place 2 pieces of eggplant on a plate

ladle a big scoop of sauce on top so it covers the eggplant

top with a handful of cheese

place in the oven for a few minutes until cheese melts

serve

enjoy

How to Select and Store Eggplants

Choose eggplants that are firm and heavy for their size. Their skin should be smooth and shiny, and their color, whether it be purple, white or green, should be vivid. They should be free of discoloration, scars, and bruises, which usually indicate that the flesh beneath has become damaged and possibly decayed.

The stem and cap, on either end of the eggplant, should be bright green in color. As you would with other fruits and vegetables, avoid purchasing eggplant that has been waxed. To test for the ripeness of an eggplant, gently press the skin with the pad of your thumb. If it springs back, the eggplant is ripe, while if an indentation remains, it is not.

At WHFoods, we encourage the purchase of certified organically grown foods, and eggplant is no exception. Repeated research studies on organic foods as a group show that your likelihood of exposure to contaminants such as pesticides and heavy metals can be greatly reduced through the purchased of certified organic foods, including eggplant. In many cases, you may be able to find a local organic grower who sells eggplant but has not applied for formal organic certification either through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) or through a state agency. (Examples of states offering state-certified organic foods include California, New York, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington.) However, if you are shopping in a large supermarket, your most reliable source of organically grown eggplant is very likely to be eggplant that displays the USDA organic logo.

Although they look hardy, eggplants are actually very perishable and care should be taken in their storage. Eggplants are sensitive to both heat and cold and should ideally be stored at around 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius). Do not cut eggplant before you store it as it perishes quickly once its skin has been punctured or its inner flesh exposed.

Place uncut and unwashed eggplant in a plastic bag and store in the refrigerator crisper where it will keep for a few days. If it is too large for the crisper, do not try to force it in; this will damage the skin and cause the eggplant to spoil and decay. Instead, place it on a shelf within the refrigerator.

Here is some background on why we recommend refrigerating eggplant. Whenever food is stored, four basic factors affect its nutrient composition: exposure to air, exposure to light, exposure to heat, and length of time in storage. Vitamin C, vitamin B6, and carotenoids are good examples of nutrients highly susceptible to heat, and for this reason, their loss from food is very likely to be slowed down through refrigeration.

If you purchase eggplant that is wrapped in plastic film, remove it as soon as possible since it will inhibit the eggplant from breathing and degrade its freshness.

Read More On Eggplants Here

jennifer rice

Jennifer Rice is a lover of all things living and has dedicated her life to making a difference to all those who cross her path.
A passion for mind and body movement has led her into a long and successful career in pilates; teaching on a global scale, with clients in Canada, New Zealand, Dubai,LA and Jordan and more recently, Spain.
Her understanding of how the human body performs, combined with her extensive knowledge of nutrition and natural health therapies, allow Jennifer to be the complete wellness expert.
Not content to just help humans, Jennifer has a heart for animals and has been known to spend her time, when she isn’t working with clients or in her garden, at her local animal refuge centre, donating her time to our furry or feathered friends in need.
A wanderlust spirit keeps Jennifer on the move and her worldly outlook on life brings a refreshing point of view; always with a smile and an open heart

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